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Discuss: The Legend of the Story Speakers

Myrkin · 19 · 3271

Myrkin

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I am a bit surprised that none make a topic about that one episode. Thats good for me though, as I can start it. :)

In this episode we get to know that a Grandpa Longneck was a famous storyteller and the gang meets his old friend - Saro. The latter comes to convince Grandpa to travel with him and tell longneck's stories to herds in MB, however Grandpa refuse because he thinks that GV is a place he should stay in. That angers Saro and he leaves the Valley...

That kept me wondering: why Saro acted in such way? Yes, I know that in MB longnecks started to forget great stories of their past and that's a main reason Saro was looking for Granpa. Although it is obvious that Saro could tell stories by himself. At begining of episode he even suggested that Granpa might make a mistake while presenting the story of Starwatcher. Saro felt that he isnt able to take upon himself the responsibility of becoming a Story Speaker. I think that beliefe flows from great respect Saro has for Granpa (he almost idealizes him as a story teller) and because Saro was always telling the legends with Granpa beside him, he might be a little afraid to do that alone. It took Granpa words and event with Littlefoot and Chomper to make him believe in his abilities.

Another thought... Maybe Saro's overreaction to Granpa's "no" arose from their friendship? I mean, maybe Saro saw this not only as "turning back on longnecks and their tradition", but also as best friend letting him down?
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"My heart has joined the thousand, for my friend stopped running today." - Watership Down by Richard Adams.


Kor

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It was likely a mixture of that.  And as for not thinking of doing it himself he likely may not have thought he was good enough yet.  And he was likely kidding Grandpa about getting part of the story wrong, not really meaning it.  

It does explain why Grandpa Longneck was so good at telling stories, as seen in some movies.  And the reasons he gave for not traveling with Saro were good reasons, and he can still tell his stories to the longnecks & non longnecks, who live in and visit the great valley.  




Myrkin

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Quote from: Kor,Feb 21 2009 on  11:54 AM
And he was likely kidding Grandpa about getting part of the story wrong, not really meaning it.
Maybe. Or maybe not. Remember when Granpa said he had begun to forget some of these stories? There is a slight chance that Saro was actually serious about getting story wrong. Probably you are the one who is right, but you cannot be too sure. ;)
Pessimist sees a dark tunnel. Optimist sees a light in the tunnel. Realist sees the light of coming train. And a driver sees three idiots standing on the track.

"My heart has joined the thousand, for my friend stopped running today." - Watership Down by Richard Adams.


Kor

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I'd have to watch the episode, assuming it's on a dvd and not the 1 that's not on a dvd yet.  

I wonder if Grandpa Longneck told any longneck stories to Ali's herd during her second visit offscreen.  Or even their first visit after he got better and before they left, since they could have been there overnight, days, weeks, before we saw the scene where she leaves at the end of the 4th movie.


Spartanguy88

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I thought this episode was pretty good.

There's just one scene I can't stop thinking about. When Chomper catches up to Littlefoot, who then asks what he's doing there; all Chomper says is "I was following you."

I was thinking, and I'm pretty sure Littlefoot was as well, "Um... why?"

 :lol


Myrkin

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I am sure that Chomper had his (perfectly innocent) reasons. :p


There was one sentence in the last song which didnt make much sense to me. Littlefoot sung:

"Chomper. Take a deep breath and calm down."

Well... Chomper was perfectly calm in that moment. He had just lost his spirit, but he wasnt panicking (like he was in "Mysterious tooth crisis") so it would more fit for Littlefoot to sing:

"Chomper. Dont give up and dont lose a hope."

By the way... I think that music in this song is nice, but they really could do something with voice acting. I mean, Littlefoot and Chomper sounded more like they're talking and not singing (at least they sounded that way to me ;) ).
Pessimist sees a dark tunnel. Optimist sees a light in the tunnel. Realist sees the light of coming train. And a driver sees three idiots standing on the track.

"My heart has joined the thousand, for my friend stopped running today." - Watership Down by Richard Adams.


Littlefoot3897

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Is it true that Littlefoot's mother comes out as a young longneck playing in the waterfall or something? Sorry I haven't seen this episode and I can't find it anywhere. :anger


somerandomfangirl

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Casually bumping this topic. :DD

^^
It could be Littlefoot's mother, but because that longneck is so small and we can't see much of the detail, it could be anyone, really. Perhaps it was one of Grandma and Grandpa Longneck's other children, or perhaps it was one of Saro's children. However, it is presumed to be Littlefoot's mother, since she's the only known child of Grandpa and Grandma or Saro and his mate.

As for this episode, it's one of the few TV episodes that I like... for the first half. :lol
Hey, any episode that would focus solely on Grandpa Longneck and his past will catch my attention. :DD

Anyway, it was interesting and nice to see Saro introduced as Grandpa's best friend. He seems like an interesting enough character. I see Saro as carefree most of the time but can get too easily offended or irked when someone turns something important to him away, like Grandpa refused to come back to be a story speaker again. I can perfectly understand his reasons why; I think Saro is younger than Grandpa and probably doesn't realise how old he is getting. The Mysterious Beyond would be dangerous for Grandpa, Grandma and Littlefoot, if he decided to bring them along, and I know he wouldn't leave his family to do his job.

The idea of Grandpa being a story speaker does explain how he is able to tell his stories so well. I also enjoyed how this showed us a bit more of his past. My guess is that he probably learned a lot from his own grandfather (he did mention in 6 that most of the stories he told the children had been told to him by his grandpa when he was young. This to me raises the question of whether Grandpa's grandpa was a story speaker himself, but I doubt we'll ever know that) and he went about telling the stories before he and Grandma became mates and he settled down to have his own family.

Even so, he probably migrated for some time with them and carried on with telling his stories in the process. Saro mentions nothing about Grandpa ever retiring, and since we see that little longneck who could be Littlefoot's mother during the 'Remembering' scene, it shows that Saro probably stuck around with Grandpa for a lot of his life. I suppose the Great Drought halted Grandpa's story speaking with the struggle for survival, and may have also separated him from Saro in the process. I like the idea of Saro being like a younger brother to Grandpa in some respects; he really looks up to him and seems to think much higher of Grandpa than himself, especially with the story speaking job.

Right, I'm thinking waaaaay too much into this now. :lol

Back to the episode: I like the idea of Littlefoot going after Saro to make sure that he and Grandpa make up again. Uh, wait... he says he has to find Saro to pretty much tell HIM to be the story speaker. Never mind the friendship troubles, then. :p
Anyway, after Littlefoot and Chomper reach Saro, a convenient earthshake traps them all out, and gives Saro the perfect opportunity to tell them a story to calm them down. This story is quite interesting, but I dunno, there's something about it that I don't like. Oh well, this isn't really a big thing, so I'll let it pass.

One thing I definitely didn't like was the second song that Littlefoot and Chomper sang. It wasn't necessary. It wasn't necessary to put two songs into every episode. There was nothing else to sing about in that episode, so they just sang a conversation that could have just been said.

Second thing that confuses me is Saro's sudden storming off. I can understand he was disappointed but his reaction was a bit extreme if you ask me. By the looks of it, Grandpa and Saro hadn't seen each other in a very long time and may have possibly presumed each other dead or doubted they would see each other again ("I had given up hope!"), so I don't get why Saro would just walk out of the Great Valley again after just arriving because Grandpa said no to taking up the job. It almost felt as if Saro didn't want to see him again. I don't understand why he would think this when he was acting like Grandpa's best friend at the start of the episode. Surely he can't have always been like that, or else their friendship was likely not to have lasted so long. I suppose the writers just decided that it made enough sense to do this to carry on the plot of the episode. I don't really agree that this was the right approach, but there's not much that can be done about it now. :p

Overall, I think it's one of the better episodes, but it had it's faults. Still, an interesting episode, and at least Grandpa and Saro made up in the end. :DD

That was one heck of big review from me... :wow


Sleeping-force's-inside

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Gotta agree with SRFG there, I too was wondering why the crap Saro stormed off like that o.O

More importantly, why did GRANDPA not go after him? I'd figure he'd want to rekindle such a close friendship even if they might part ways again with one of them in the MB and the other in the GV :/


Kor

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I agree with the above points.  It could be that Grandpa Longneck may tell stories to some of the wondering herds with longnecks in them off screen.  Littlefoot may do that one day when he gets older.


rhombus

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I found this to be a rather enjoyable episode that elaborates a bit more on Grandpa Longneck's history, a subject for which we have been given very little information.  However there was one thing that seemed off to me, as somerandomfangirl has already pointed out:

Quote
Second thing that confuses me is Saro's sudden storming off. I can understand he was disappointed but his reaction was a bit extreme if you ask me. By the looks of it, Grandpa and Saro hadn't seen each other in a very long time and may have possibly presumed each other dead or doubted they would see each other again ("I had given up hope!"), so I don't get why Saro would just walk out of the Great Valley again after just arriving because Grandpa said no to taking up the job. It almost felt as if Saro didn't want to see him again. I don't understand why he would think this when he was acting like Grandpa's best friend at the start of the episode. Surely he can't have always been like that, or else their friendship was likely not to have lasted so long. I suppose the writers just decided that it made enough sense to do this to carry on the plot of the episode. I don't really agree that this was the right approach, but there's not much that can be done about it now.

I have to agree with your point here.  It made no sense for me to have Saro suddenly storm off like that.  It would have made more sense (but probably was less convenient for the plot) to have him be downcast after hearing Grandpa's rejection of the idea, have him express himself in a bit more of a mature way (i.e. I regret to hear that, I need some time to think...), and then go off alone to contemplate the situation (as Ruby tends to do, for example) and then to have the rest of the plot follow the general pattern of the episode.  It would have flowed better and Saro's actions would seem much more reasonable.


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Kor

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It did seem like something someone Littlefoot's age would do, but not Saro's age.  Though it was a set up for what happened afterwards, it could have been done better.  Also Saro seemed to have no real reaction to Chomper.   Though I've not seen the episode in a while and may have forgotten details.  It does explain why Grandpa is so good at telling stories and seems to enjoy doing so.  Also though it's not shown one can assume he does so off-screen every night, and perhaps to visiting herds also.   It also raises the question, to me at least, if other types have their story speakers, threehorns, flyers, ect.


rhombus

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Quote from: Kor,Apr 20 2014 on  02:14 PM
It also raises the question, to me at least, if other types have their story speakers, threehorns, flyers, ect.
That is a very good point.  We have seen Grandpa tell legendary stories on several occasions in the series, but not the others with the exception of Pterano in the seventh movie.  I wonder how the temperaments of the other species would effect how they would tell their legends?


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Kor

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I do also.  It would be interesting to see and hear those.


Ducky123

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^I can pretty much tell what threehorn-stories are about :lol

Okay, so I watched this episode and here's what I think:

I have to join the opinion of somerandomfangirl and rhombus. Saro's reaction to Grandpa's decline was quite an overreaction if you ask me. The overall idea is cool; giving some insight on Grandpa's younger days was a good idea though they, like always, didn't do perfect. Still, it was enjoyable to watch and not outright annoying :p
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Kor

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& insight why he is good at telling stories.  

I can imagine what the other species story speaker's stories are like.  We see a glimpse of Petrie's uncle telling part of a story that Petrie repeats the beginning of.  

I did like the episode but they could have had the middle to the ending be different which would have improved the story in my opinion.


fanciful_flyer

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This is one of my favorite episodes, as I thought Saro was a nice surprise. :)

I think everything you said is right. It pretty much sums up why Saro took Grandpa Longneck's refusal so hard.
I can see him traveling to the Great Valley in search of Grandpa Longneck, all the while being 100% convinced that his old friend wouldn't refuse his offer. If he didn't anticipate a refusal, naturally that might cause him to overreact, or at least take it harder than he needed to. Seems like he had his mind set on Grandpa Longneck coming with him.

I also wonder how old Saro is supposed to be. Younger than Grandpa Longneck, obviously, but just how young I wonder. They were friends long ago, clearly, so Saro can't be that much younger. (Though for all I know maybe he is in the same age range as Grandpa Longneck. He just seemed a little younger, somehow.)


StardustSoldier

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Yeah, I too have to agree with somerandomfangirl, Sleeping-force's-inside, rhombus, Kor, and Ducky123. Saro's reaction was too exaggerated and abrupt. It actually surprised me when I was watching the episode how he suddenly got all huffy and indignant like that.
:!

But overall, this was a pretty good episode. Cool concept too. Kinda makes me wish they'd done more episodes dedicated to legendary stories like the one about Tall Stepper. It was also fun to have Littlefoot and Chomper go out on their own nighttime adventure. I give the episode a 7/10.
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One of my favorites as well. Thanks to general concept of storytellers, atmosphere and context of these tales, Grandpa's backstory (and possible cameo of young Littlefoot's mom!), and Lttlefoot&Chomper only travel (wanna see more of these!).
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